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ID Date Author Topic Subjectup
  1999   24 Sep 2020 Gennaro TortoneForumsubrun
Hi,

I was wondering if there is a "mechanism" to run an executable
file after each subrun is closed...

I need to convert .mid.lz4 subrun files to ROOT (TTree) files;

Thanks,
Gennaro
  2046   01 Dec 2020 Stefan RittForumsubrun
There is no "mechanism" foreseen to be executed after each subrun. But you could 
run a shell script after each run which loops over all subruns and converts them 
one after the other.

Stefan

> Hi,
> 
> I was wondering if there is a "mechanism" to run an executable
> file after each subrun is closed...
> 
> I need to convert .mid.lz4 subrun files to ROOT (TTree) files;
> 
> Thanks,
> Gennaro
  2047   01 Dec 2020 Ben SmithForumsubrun
We use the lazylogger for something similar to this. You can specify the path to a custom script, and it will be run for each midas file that gets written:
https://midas.triumf.ca/MidasWiki/index.php/Lazylogger#Using_a_script
This means that you don't have to wait until the end of the run to start processing.

If the ROOT conversion is going to be slow, but you have a batch system available, you could use the lazylogger script to submit a job to the batch system for each file.

> 
> > Hi,
> > 
> > I was wondering if there is a "mechanism" to run an executable
> > file after each subrun is closed...
> > 
> > I need to convert .mid.lz4 subrun files to ROOT (TTree) files;
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > Gennaro
  675   25 Nov 2009 Konstantin OlchanskiBug Fixsubrun file size
Please be aware of mlogger.c update rev 4566 on Sept 23rd 2009, when Stefan
fixed a buglet in the subrun file size computations. Before this fix, the first
subrun could be of a short length. If you use subruns, please update your
mlogger to at least rev 4566 (or newer, Stefan added the run and subrun time
limits just recently).
K.O.
  1793   26 Jan 2020 Konstantin OlchanskiBug Reportsupport for mbedtls - get an open ssl error while trying to compile Midas
> >
> > .../c++  ...  /opt/local/lib/libssl.dylib
> >
> 
> I get the same, libssl from /opt/local, so we are not using openssl shipped with mac os.
> 

I note that latest mongoose 6.16 finally has a virtual ssl layer and appears to support mbedtls (polarssl) in addition to openssl.

I now think I should see if it works - as it gives us a way to support https without relying on the user having
pre-installed working openssl packages - we consistently run into problems with openssl on macos, and even
on linux there was trouble with preinstalled openssl packages and libraries.

With mbedtls, one will have to "git pull" and "make" it, but historically this causes much less trouble.

Also, with luck, mbedtls has better support for certificate expiration (I would really love to have openssl report an error
or a warning or at least some hint if I feed it an expired certificate) and (gasp!) certbot integration.

K.O.
  1794   26 Jan 2020 Konstantin OlchanskiBug Reportsupport for mbedtls - get an open ssl error while trying to compile Midas
> ... support for certbot

The certbot tool to use instead of certbot is this: https://github.com/ndilieto/uacme

K.O.
  1795   28 Jan 2020 Berta BeltranBug Reportsupport for mbedtls - get an open ssl error while trying to compile Midas
> > ... support for certbot
> 
> The certbot tool to use instead of certbot is this: https://github.com/ndilieto/uacme
> 
> K.O.


HI Stefan and Konstantin, 

Thanks a lot for your messages. Sorry for my late reply, I only work on this project from Tuesday to Thursdays. I have 
run " make cmake" instead of "cd build; cmake" and this is the output regarding mhttpd:

/Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/usr/bin/c++  -O2 -g -DNDEBUG -Wl,-search_paths_first -Wl,-
headerpad_max_install_names  CMakeFiles/mhttpd.dir/mhttpd.cxx.o CMakeFiles/mhttpd.dir/mongoose6.cxx.o 
CMakeFiles/mhttpd.dir/mgd.cxx.o CMakeFiles/mhttpd.dir/__/mscb/src/mscb.cxx.o  -o mhttpd  -lsqlite3 ../libmidas.a 
/usr/lib/libssl.dylib /usr/lib/libcrypto.dylib -lz -lsqlite3 /usr/lib/libssl.dylib /usr/lib/libcrypto.dylib -lz 
Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "_OPENSSL_init_ssl", referenced from:
      _mg_mgr_init in mongoose6.cxx.o
  "_SSL_CTX_set_options", referenced from:
      _mg_set_ssl in mongoose6.cxx.o
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64
clang: error: linker command failed with exit code 1 (use -v to see invocation)


I see that in your outputs the openssl libs are in /opt/local/lib/ while mine are in /usr/lib/, and that is the only difference. 
I have checked that the libraries libssl.dylib and libcrypto.dylib are in my /usr/lib/, and indeed they are, so I don't 
understand the reason for the error, I will continue investigating. 

Thanks 

Berta 
  1804   02 Feb 2020 Konstantin OlchanskiBug Reportsupport for mbedtls - get an open ssl error while trying to compile Midas
> I only work on this project from Tuesday to Thursdays.

No problem. No hurry.

> I have run " make cmake" instead of "cd build; cmake" and this is the output regarding mhttpd: ...

There should be also a line where mhttpd.cxx is compiled into mhttpd.o, we need to see what compiler
flags are used - I suspect the compiler uses header files from /usr/local/include while the linker
is using libraries from /usr/lib, a mismatch.

To save time, please attach the full output of "make cmake". There may be something else I want to see there.

If you do not use the mhttpd built-in https support (for best security I recommend using https from the apache httpd password protected https proxy),
then it is perfectly fine to build midas with NO_SSL=1.

K.O.
  343   11 Feb 2007 Konstantin OlchanskiInfosvn and "make indent" trashed my svn checkout tree...
Fuming, fuming, fuming.

The combination of "make indent" and "svn update" completely trashed my work copy of midas. Half of 
the files now show as status "M", half as status "C" ("in conflict"), even those I never edited myself (e.g. 
mscb firmware files).

I think what happened as that once I ran "make indent", the indent program did things to the source 
files (changed indentation, added spaces in "foo(a,b,c); --> foo(a, b, c);" etc, so now svn thinks that I 
edited the files and they are in conflict with later modifications.

I suggest that nobody ever ever ever should use "make indent", and if they do, they should better 
commit their "changes" made by indent very quickly, before their midas tree is trashed by the next "svn 
update".

And if they commit the changes made by "make indent", beware that "make indent" is not idempotent, 
running it multiple times, it keeps changing files (keeps moving some dox comments around).

Also beware of entering a tug-of-war with Stefan - at least on my machines, my "make indent" seems 
to produce different output from his.

Still fuming, even after some venting...
K.O.
  249   23 Mar 2006 Sergio BallestreroInfosvn@savannah.psi.ch down ?
 Hi,
I was trying to update the checkout of Midas, but it looks like something is not
working - maybe a component of the Savannah system:
[sergio@daq-pc midas-SVN]$ svn update
svn@savannah.psi.ch's password: svn
unix dgram connect: Connection refused at /bin/cvssh.pl line 32
no connection to syslog available at /bin/cvssh.pl line 32
svn: Connection closed unexpectedly

my .svn/entries says (amongst the rest)
 url="svn+ssh://svn@savannah.psi.ch/afs/psi.ch/project/meg/svn/midas/trunk"
and yes, it used to work well... 

Cheers,
  Sergio
  250   26 Mar 2006 Stefan RittInfosvn@savannah.psi.ch down ?
>  Hi,
> I was trying to update the checkout of Midas, but it looks like something is not
> working - maybe a component of the Savannah system:
> [sergio@daq-pc midas-SVN]$ svn update
> svn@savannah.psi.ch's password: svn
> unix dgram connect: Connection refused at /bin/cvssh.pl line 32
> no connection to syslog available at /bin/cvssh.pl line 32
> svn: Connection closed unexpectedly
> 
> my .svn/entries says (amongst the rest)
>  url="svn+ssh://svn@savannah.psi.ch/afs/psi.ch/project/meg/svn/midas/trunk"
> and yes, it used to work well... 
> 
> Cheers,
>   Sergio

I just tried now and it seemed to work fine. Do you still have the problem?

- Stefan
  251   27 Mar 2006 Sergio BallestreroInfosvn@savannah.psi.ch down ?
> I just tried now and it seemed to work fine. Do you still have the problem?
> 
> - Stefan

 The problem was still there this morning, shortly after seeing your mail, but seems
to be fixed now.
 BTW, which is the best way to submit patches ? I have a version of khyt1331 for Linux
kernel 2.6 (we are running Scientific Linux 4.1), and a few smaller things, mostly in
the examples. 

 Thanks, Sergio
  1815   10 Feb 2020 Konstantin OlchanskiSuggestionswitch midas to c++ threads?
Hi, Stefan & co - now that midas is c++11 and c++11 comes with a threads library, should we 
switch midas to use the c++11 threads instead of pthreads? (Of course on Linux c++11 
threads are a layer on top of pthreads, the best I know).

This should remove the dependency on pthreads.h and use a more native implementation of 
threads on MacOS and Windows. (again, the best I can tell).

Of course this depends on c++11 threads having all the functions we need. Specifically, "lock 
with timeout" is useful to deal with "gah! everything stopped! what do I do!", a problem 
bedeviling midas in the early days (and still happens today!). Current midas kills everything 
after 5 minutes of deadlock - then the user knows how to restart everything and the developer 
has core dumps to look at. (to see which program/thread holds the lock and would not give it 
up).

Any thoughts on this?

K.O.
  1817   11 Feb 2020 Stefan RittSuggestionswitch midas to c++ threads?
I'm thinking of this already since some time, and it was part of my motivation switching to C++11.
I was delighted to see that what we do in system.c (encapsulate system functions such as threads
and shared memory) is now done natively in C++11, and it's done by experts and not amateurs like us.

I see that with std::timed_mutex and try_lock_for we have the desired timeout function. Pity that
C++11 does not contain inter-process communication like semaphores, so there we still have to use
our old functions. 

But for threads switching to std::thread, I'm all in.

Stefan

> Hi, Stefan & co - now that midas is c++11 and c++11 comes with a threads library, should we 
> switch midas to use the c++11 threads instead of pthreads? (Of course on Linux c++11 
> threads are a layer on top of pthreads, the best I know).
> 
> This should remove the dependency on pthreads.h and use a more native implementation of 
> threads on MacOS and Windows. (again, the best I can tell).
> 
> Of course this depends on c++11 threads having all the functions we need. Specifically, "lock 
> with timeout" is useful to deal with "gah! everything stopped! what do I do!", a problem 
> bedeviling midas in the early days (and still happens today!). Current midas kills everything 
> after 5 minutes of deadlock - then the user knows how to restart everything and the developer 
> has core dumps to look at. (to see which program/thread holds the lock and would not give it 
> up).
> 
> Any thoughts on this?
> 
> K.O.
  1819   11 Feb 2020 Berta BeltranSuggestionswitch midas to c++ threads?
> Hi, Stefan & co - now that midas is c++11 and c++11 comes with a threads library, should we 
> switch midas to use the c++11 threads instead of pthreads? (Of course on Linux c++11 
> threads are a layer on top of pthreads, the best I know).
> 
> This should remove the dependency on pthreads.h and use a more native implementation of 
> threads on MacOS and Windows. (again, the best I can tell).
> 
> Of course this depends on c++11 threads having all the functions we need. Specifically, "lock 
> with timeout" is useful to deal with "gah! everything stopped! what do I do!", a problem 
> bedeviling midas in the early days (and still happens today!). Current midas kills everything 
> after 5 minutes of deadlock - then the user knows how to restart everything and the developer 
> has core dumps to look at. (to see which program/thread holds the lock and would not give it 
> up).
> 
> Any thoughts on this?
> 
> K.O.

Hi, I just wanted to say that I have seen this post and maybe that is the solution to the pthreads compiler problem in OS 10.15, but 
of course I am a total amateur in here. Thanks for thinking about this and I will wait and hold to see what gets decided. Thanks

Berta  
  1519   15 Apr 2019 Konstantin OlchanskiInfoswitch of MIDAS to C++
For a long time now we have keep the core of midas (odb.c, midas.c, etc) compatible with plain C and by default 
we have built the MIDAS library using the plain C compiler. Over time, we have switched most MIDAS programs 
(mhttpd, mlogger, mdump, odbedit, etc) to C++ (with happy results). (and for a long time now, all of MIDAS 
could be build as C++, even if the default build remained plain C).

The main reason for keeping the core of MIDAS as C has been to allow writing MIDAS frontends in C - for 
example, in environments with no C++ compilers or no C++ runtime (VxWorks) or where C++ had too much 
overhead (small memory machines, etc).

Today, all concerns against using C++ seem to have receded into the past. C++ compilers are now always 
available, even for small embedded systems. C++ overheads are now well understood and one can easily write 
C++ code that is as efficient as C for using limited CPU and memory resources. (While at the same time, today's 
embedded systems tend to have more CPU and RAM than "big" MIDAS DAQ machines had in the past - 1GHz 
CPU, 1GB RAM is pretty typical for embedded ARM).

As examples of small hardware where MIDAS frontends written in C++ worked just fine, consider the T2K ND280 
FGD data collector running on XILINX FPGA with a 300MHz PowerPC and 128 Mbytes of RAM (standard Linux 
kernel) and the GRIFFIN Clock distribution module control running on a Microsemi FPGA with a 300MHz ARM 
CPU (ucLinux without an MMU). More typical Cyclone-5 ARM SoCs with 1GB RAM and 1GHz CPU run standard 
Linux (CentOS7) and can build MIDAS natively (no need for cross-compiling).

With the removal of the requirement to make it possible to write MIDAS frontends in C, we can switch the MIDAS 
default build to C++ and start using C++ features in the MIDAS API (std::string, std::vector, etc).

Next to consider is "which C++ should we use?".

K.O.
  1531   22 May 2019 Konstantin OlchanskiInfoswitch of MIDAS to C++
> switch MIDAS to C++

switch to C++ will proceed as follows:

- create a new branch off develop (feature/switch_to_cxx)
- remove all extern "C", ifdef c++, etc
- switch Makefile from gcc to g++
- test
- merge into develop
- before merge, tag the last "C" midas
- cut a new release branch (tentatively feature/midas-2019-06)

the last recommended "pre-C++" midas will remain the midas-2019-03 release (where we can retroactively apply bug fixes, as I just did a few minutes ago).

K.O.
  1521   15 Apr 2019 Konstantin OlchanskiInfoswitch of MIDAS to C++, how much C++?
> >
> > With the removal of the requirement to make it possible to write MIDAS frontends in C, we can switch the MIDAS 
> > default build to C++ and start using C++ features in the MIDAS API (std::string, std::vector, etc).
> > 

C++ is a big animal. Obviously we want to use std::string, std::vector and similar improvements over plain C (we already use "//" for comments).

But in keeping with the Camel's nose fable (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose), there are some parts of C++ we definitely do not want to use in MIDAS. Even the C++ FAQ talks 
about "evil features", see https://isocpp.org/wiki/faq/big-picture#use-evil-things-sometimes

Here is my list of things to use and to avoid. Comments on this are very welcome - as everybody's experience with C++ is different (and everybody's experience is very valuable and very 
welcome).

- std::string, std:vector, etc are in. I am already using them in the MIDAS API (midas.h)
- extern "C" is out, everything has to be C++, will remove "extern "C"" from all midas header files.
- exceptions are out, see https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1736146/why-is-exception-handling-bad
- std::thread and std::mutex are in, at least for writing new frontends, but see discussion of "cannot use c++11". (maybe replace ss_mutex_xxx() with out own std::mutex look-alike).
- heavy use of templates and heavy use of argument overloading is out - just by looking at the code, impossible to tell what function will be called
- "auto" is on probation. I need to know if "auto v=f()" is an integer or a double when I write "auto w=v/2" or "auto w=v/2.0". see 
https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/180216/does-auto-make-c-code-harder-to-understand
- unreadable gibberish is out (lambdas, etc)
- C-style malloc()/free() is in. C++ new and delete are okey, but "delete[]" confuses me.
- C-style printf() is in. C++ cout and "<<" gunk provide no way to easily format the output for easy reading.

K.O.
  1522   16 Apr 2019 Pintaudi GiorgioInfoswitch of MIDAS to C++, how much C++?
Dear Konstantin,

even if I am still quite young and have only limited experience (but not null), I would like to give my two cents. I have reflected a bit about the C++ issue, also because I am developing a 
brand new MIDAS interface for the WAGASCI-T2K experiment, and I feel that the future of MIDAS could influence the future of our DAQ system, too. I'll start from the conclusions: I completely 
agree with you on a practical level, even if I kind of disagree on an "ethical" level.

What you propose in essence is to migrate the MIDAS core from pure C to a version of C with some fancy C++ features. Let's say a kind of C+ with only one plus. Theoretically speaking, even if 
on the surface C and C++ are very similar, they are completely different languages and require different mindsets (and I am sure that everyone is aware of it). This is the reason why even if I 
would have preferred to develop the MIDAS frontend for our experiment in C++, I have chosen to stick to pure C because I feel that MIDAS is still very C-like in its architecture (or from what 
I can see from the documentation). So I wanted to "keep on track" for better internal coherence. What I mean is that, if someone told me to port a C project of mine to C++, I would end up 
rewriting it almost completely, instead of just modifying it (I really don't know how much of the MIDAS core has been written with C++ in mind, so if a large part of it is already C++-like, 
please ignore my comment above).

Anyway, on a practical level, I completely agree with your approach, because I imagine that a complete rewrite of MIDAS is off the table but, at the same time, some new C++ features like 
better string and vector handling are very tempting to use. Moreover, in general, physicists are more familiar with the C syntax than with the C++ one (but thanks to ROOT that is changing). As 
for the use of MIDAS in embedded devices, I have no experience so I refrain from judging. So, in the particular case of MIDAS, what you propose is probably the best and only option.

As far as the C++ standard to adopt, I would say that the C++11 standard is the best fit for the T2K experiment since the official OS for T2K is CentOS7 and, out of the box, it supports C++11 
only. Anyway, I acknowledge that there are many other experiments and requirements. For the records, I do development on Ubuntu 18.04.

Best regards
Giorgio
  1523   17 Apr 2019 John M O'DonnellInfoswitch of MIDAS to C++, how much C++?
some semi-random thoughts:

no templates strictly means you can't use std::string, std::vector etc.

printf is in any case part of C++ (#include <cstdio>), but std::ostreams can be faster (for std::cout, endl line causes buffer flushing, whereas "\n" does not flush the buffer but printf
always flushes the buffer), and formatting is possible (though very long winded).  printf does not allow to print things other than simple data, e.g. BANK_HEADER* bh; printf( "%?", *bh);

I've been writing all our DAQ code in C++ for a while now.

> > >
> > > With the removal of the requirement to make it possible to write MIDAS frontends in C, we can switch the MIDAS 
> > > default build to C++ and start using C++ features in the MIDAS API (std::string, std::vector, etc).
> > > 
> 
> C++ is a big animal. Obviously we want to use std::string, std::vector and similar improvements over plain C (we already use "//" for comments).
> 
> But in keeping with the Camel's nose fable (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel%27s_nose), there are some parts of C++ we definitely do not want to use in MIDAS. Even the C++ FAQ talks 
> about "evil features", see https://isocpp.org/wiki/faq/big-picture#use-evil-things-sometimes
> 
> Here is my list of things to use and to avoid. Comments on this are very welcome - as everybody's experience with C++ is different (and everybody's experience is very valuable and very 
> welcome).
> 
> - std::string, std:vector, etc are in. I am already using them in the MIDAS API (midas.h)
> - extern "C" is out, everything has to be C++, will remove "extern "C"" from all midas header files.
> - exceptions are out, see https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1736146/why-is-exception-handling-bad
> - std::thread and std::mutex are in, at least for writing new frontends, but see discussion of "cannot use c++11". (maybe replace ss_mutex_xxx() with out own std::mutex look-alike).
> - heavy use of templates and heavy use of argument overloading is out - just by looking at the code, impossible to tell what function will be called
> - "auto" is on probation. I need to know if "auto v=f()" is an integer or a double when I write "auto w=v/2" or "auto w=v/2.0". see 
> https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/180216/does-auto-make-c-code-harder-to-understand
> - unreadable gibberish is out (lambdas, etc)
> - C-style malloc()/free() is in. C++ new and delete are okey, but "delete[]" confuses me.
> - C-style printf() is in. C++ cout and "<<" gunk provide no way to easily format the output for easy reading.
> 
> K.O.
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