Back Midas Rome Roody Rootana
  Midas DAQ System, Page 2 of 122  Not logged in ELOG logo
IDup Date Author Topic Subject
  21   09 Jul 2004 John M O'Donnell Introduction of environment variable MIDASSYS
For a long time the "de facto" standard was to spread a package around in many
directories under /usr/local.  This proved to be a bad idea, as removing the
package
became very difficult.

With POSIX there is a written standard, which says that each pacakge goes in
it's own
directory under /opt. eg. /opt/midas.  Each package gets to define it's own
structure
within that directory.  One could imagine several versions installed at the
same time
/opt/midas/v1.9.2 and /opt/midas/v1.9.4 each with a bin, lib include etc. 
Following the
ROOT example, you could make a link from /opt/midas/pro to
/opt/midas/v1.9.4, so that
system files and login files are easy to maintain etc.  The basic idea is

MIDASSYS=/opt/midas/pro
PATH=$PATH:$MIDASSYS/bin

though a more sophisticated approach is

MIDASSYS=/opt/midas/pro
echo $PATH | grep -q $MIDASSYS || PATH=$PATH:$MIDASSYS/bin

where the assignment line (Bourne shell, and BASH shell) ensures
that multiple entries are not added on the PATH even if the script is more
than once.

POSIX also goes on to say that links from /opt/bin can be made if desired. 
I find this
usefull if a package has only one or two executables, and I don't to make
multiple
versions available.

I hope that the POSIX ideas are usefull,

John.

> > Here's my suggestion
> > MIDASSYS=/opt/midas-1.9.4 (for example)   
> 
> I guess we should follow the "standard" as much as possible. MIDASSYS was
inspired by
> ROOTSYS. Now where do people usually install ROOT? Is it /opt/root-x.x.x
or something
> else. Some years ago (when I did the last time some linux administration)
optional
> packages were put into /usr/local by default. I guess you have more
experience with
> today's tradition, so do whatever you thing is standard.
> 
> > so the Linux binaries would go to 
> > MIDASHOST=i386-pc-linux-gnu
> > $MIDASSYS/$MIDASHOST/bin
> > $MIDASSYS/$MIDASHOST/lib
> 
> Does that mean that the path has to be modified to include
$MIDASSYS/$MIDASHOST/bin?
> If we put a link to /usr/local/bin, the path does not have to be modified.
What about
> shared libraries? Does ldconfig know about /usr/local/lib, or
$MIDASYS/$MIDASHOST/lib?
> 
> > and the shared stuff would go to 
> > $MIDASSYS/include
> > $MIDASSYS/share/drivers
> > $MIDASSYS/share/examples
> 
> What about /usr/share? Is that a common place for documentatino etc?
> 
> Thanks for your advice.
> 
> - Stefan
  22   12 Jul 2004 Stefan Ritt Introduction of environment variable MIDASSYS
> With POSIX there is a written standard, which says that each pacakge goes in
> it's own
> directory under /opt. eg. /opt/midas.  Each package gets to define it's own
> structure
> within that directory.  One could imagine several versions installed at the
> same time
> /opt/midas/v1.9.2 and /opt/midas/v1.9.4 each with a bin, lib include etc. 
> Following the
> ROOT example, you could make a link from /opt/midas/pro to
> /opt/midas/v1.9.4, so that
> system files and login files are easy to maintain etc.  The basic idea is
> 
> MIDASSYS=/opt/midas/pro
> PATH=$PATH:$MIDASSYS/bin
> 
> though a more sophisticated approach is
> 
> MIDASSYS=/opt/midas/pro
> echo $PATH | grep -q $MIDASSYS || PATH=$PATH:$MIDASSYS/bin
> 
> where the assignment line (Bourne shell, and BASH shell) ensures
> that multiple entries are not added on the PATH even if the script is more
> than once.

That sounds all very good to me. So can you please sit together (at least John,
Piotr, and Pierre-Andre), discuss a common scheme and and propose it officially in
this forum for comments. After a week or so, it should be implemented into the
Makefile and installation scripts. I also would like to have Paul Knowles giving
it a look, since he voluteered to make the midas RPMs, which also heavily depends
on the chosen directory structure.
  23   14 Jul 2004 Piotr Zolnierczuk future direction discussion?
Hi,
  I think that rather than spending too much time on where to 
put files and how to define the environment - I am guilty of that myself.
We should be perhaps have some discussion on the future of MIDAS.

Are we ready for 2.0? 
Stefan - do you have any ideas/enhancements?

1) For one I would like to explore memory mapping (mmap()) on Linux
- I've used it once upon a time on DEC OSF/1 and I found it really
nice compared to shared memory. 
From a user standpoint it behaves as a shared memory but is mapped 
to a real file that can be easily "removed" when neccessary. 
One really annoying thing in MIDAS is when it goes ballistic
the cleanup which is somewhat tricky. 
The question if there is any performance penalty associated

2) Expanding hardware support: 
   a) custom microcontrolers?
   b) more hardware
   c) how about a "standard" Linux device /dev/midas
   for various PCI cards (PCI<->CAMAC) (PCI<->VME) 

3) I have never really seen a midas deployment that uses interrupts. 
I do understand the ease of polling and the fact that these days
CPU's are cheap but sometimes it is important to use interrupts.
Any examples/experience?

?)

Piotr
  24   14 Jul 2004 Piotr Zolnierczuk future directions discussion?
Sorry the previous message got mangled:

Hi, 
I think that rather than spending too much time on where to put files 
and how to define the environment - I am guilty of that myself -  we should 
perhaps have some discussion on the future of MIDAS. 

Are we ready for 2.0? 

Stefan - do you have any ideas/enhancements? 

1) For one I would like to explore memory mapping (mmap()) on Linux.
I've used it once upon a time on DEC OSF/1 and I found it really nice 
compared to shared memory. From a user standpoint it behaves as a shared
memory but is mapped to a real file that can be easily "removed" when 
neccessary. One really annoying thing in MIDAS is when it goes ballistic 
the cleanup is somewhat tricky. 
The question if there is any performance penalty associated 

2) Expanding hardware support: 
  a) custom microcontrolers? 
  b) other hardware
  c) how about a "standard" Linux device /dev/midas for various 
  PCI cards (PCI<->CAMAC) (PCI<->VME) 

3) I have never really seen a midas deployment that uses interrupts. 
I do understand the ease of polling and the fact that these days CPU's 
are cheap but sometimes it is important to use interrupts. 

Any examples/experience? 

?) 

Piotr
  25   14 Jul 2004 Stefan Ritt future direction discussion?
Have changed your entry as Non-HTML (easier to reply to...)

Here are some "initial" comments, by no means complete...

> Are we ready for 2.0? 
> Stefan - do you have any ideas/enhancements?

A big thing along the horizon I see is the ROME environment
(http://midas.psi.ch/rome/). So we will move away from PAW to ROOT. Although
the DAQ part will stay untouched, the whole analysis back-end changes,
including some XML configuration and MySQL support. I guess that would justify
a 2.0. I will discuss this at TRIUMF when I come in September, see how useful
ROME is for other users...

> 1) For one I would like to explore memory mapping (mmap()) on Linux
> - I've used it once upon a time on DEC OSF/1 and I found it really
> nice compared to shared memory. 
> From a user standpoint it behaves as a shared memory but is mapped 
> to a real file that can be easily "removed" when neccessary. 
> One really annoying thing in MIDAS is when it goes ballistic
> the cleanup which is somewhat tricky. 
> The question if there is any performance penalty associated

I guess there are no performance penalties, since under the hood both
techniques are handled similarly. The problem is that besides share memories
you need also semaphores to controll exclusive access to the memory, either
shm() funcitons or mmap(), so this would only fix half of the problem. I seem
to remember that mmap() was not available on some Ultix systems or so, but I
guess that's obsolete by now...

> 2) Expanding hardware support: 
>    a) custom microcontrolers?
>    b) more hardware
>    c) how about a "standard" Linux device /dev/midas
>    for various PCI cards (PCI<->CAMAC) (PCI<->VME) 

Well, you cannot develop hardware support for hardware you don't have, so the
policy up to now was that everyone developing some special drivers or hardware
support contributed it to the package. About c), we have already a CAMAC
driver standard, but at the user space level, so I don't see the benefit of
having kernel-mode standardized drivers. The only difference will be that the
debugging will be harder. VME standard is there in a kind of poor start right
now, but I expect to finish it this fall.

As for a), there is the MSCB system (http://midas.psi.ch/mscb) which has midas
support on the device driver and bus driver level, but I learned that
distributing hardware (or PCB designs if you like) is much harder than sharing
software. 

> 3) I have never really seen a midas deployment that uses interrupts. 
> I do understand the ease of polling and the fact that these days
> CPU's are cheap but sometimes it is important to use interrupts.
> Any examples/experience?

It's not only the "ease" of polling, but also that it's faster (in almost all
cases) and less troublesome. But hey, interrupt support is included in mfe.c,
so if you are fanatic about interrupts, please feel free to use them.
  26   15 Jul 2004 Stefan Ritt Severe bug in 1.9.4
Hello midas'ers,

Today I discovered a severe bug in the routine bm_check_buffers(), which
causes the logger to crash when it stops a run due to a reached event limit.
The funny thing is that this bug was there since the beginning, but only
recent versions of gcc and libc reveal it.

Since I consider this severe, I fixed it and updated 1.9.4 just now. I did
not go with 1.9.4-1, but maybe in future we should consider patch levels.

So please everybody who uses 1.9.4 and has problems with crashing loggers,
please update to 1.9.4 from today (July 15th, 2004).

- Stefan
  27   15 Jul 2004 Konstantin Olchanski future direction discussion?
> > Are we ready for 2.0? 

I disapprove of version number inflation. Why not go straight for midas version
3000-Pro-Z?

> A big thing along the horizon I see is the ROME environment
> (http://midas.psi.ch/rome/). So we will move away from PAW to ROOT. Although
> the DAQ part will stay untouched, the whole analysis back-end changes,
> including some XML configuration and MySQL support.

I looked at the ROME slides from Pierre, and it seems to suffer badly from the
second-system syndrome (read The Mythical Man-Month).

For us, it is important to get the data into a form where we can process it with
ROOT and I would prefer if we could concentrate in improving the (embryonic) ROOT
online analysis capabilities.

> > 1) For one I would like to explore memory mapping (mmap())

It is trivial to replace System-V shared memory with mmap(). I am surprised that
it has not been done yet. System-V semaphores are a little bit harder to get rid of.

> > 2) Expanding hardware support: 
> >    a) custom microcontrolers?
> >    b) more hardware
> >    c) how about a "standard" Linux device /dev/midas
> >    for various PCI cards (PCI<->CAMAC) (PCI<->VME) 

We cannot expect MIDAS Authors to provide drivers for all possible hardware.

At best, we can mount an effort to collect exisiting drivers from all MIDAS users
"out there" and to integrate them into MIDAS.

Even that is highly non-trivial- many drivers use non-portable native hardware
access interfaces (direct bit-banging on PPCs, VMIC library on VMIC Linux
machines, etc). We have already failed to create an efficient generic portable VME
access library.

> As for a), there is the MSCB system (http://midas.psi.ch/mscb)

I never saw the point of having tons of MIDAS code for MSCB hardware that nobody
has and nobody will ever have.

> > 3) I have never really seen a midas deployment that uses interrupts. 
>
> It's not only the "ease" of polling, but also that it's faster (in almost all
> cases) and less troublesome. But hey, interrupt support is included in mfe.c,
> so if you are fanatic about interrupts...

Interrupts are important when one cannot afford chewing up CPU cycles, memory
cycles, PCI cycles and VME cycles on polling.

As I understand, common CAMAC hardware does not generate interrupts- this explains
lack of examples and lack of interrupt use. At TRIUMF, our new VME hardware
supports interrupts and I have a VMIC-based setup where I can (and intend to) test
MIDAS support of interrupts.

K.O.
  28   20 Jul 2004 Konstantin Olchanski Introduction of environment variable MIDASSYS
> > Starting from midas version 1.9.4 on, the environment variable 'MIDASSYS' ...
> 2. What will the entire structure tree look like?
> 
> Here's my suggestion
> MIDASSYS=/opt/midas-1.9.4 (for example)   

Where should MIDAS be installed?

After looking at the LSB and at the FHS, it appears that the standards permit all of:
1) /opt/midas...
2) /usr/{bin,lib,...}
3) /usr/local/{bin,lib,...}

Some handy references:
http://www.pathname.com/fhs/pub/fhs-2.3.html
http://www.linuxbase.org/spec/

The "example LSB-compliant packages" appear to install into /opt/lsb, but I do not see
 any guidance as to where "my" packages should go.

Then, after some googling, I see that IBM "recommends" /opt (see
http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-lsb.html):

begin-quote---
To avoid name space collisions when installing LSB-conforming applications, the
applications belonging to the base operating system or the distribution are to be
installed in /sbin/, /bin/, or /usr/. System administrators can build packages from
source and install them into the /usr/local/ directory. However, third-party packages
of add-on software must be installed in /opt/<package>/, where <package> is the name
that describes a software suite.
end-quote---


K.O.
  29   21 Jul 2004 Stefan Ritt Introduction of environment variable MIDASSYS
> Where should MIDAS be installed?

I personally don't have any preference, as long as it's in accordance with "the standard"
(whatever this is). Maybe one should add a flag to the makefile to specify the
installation directory, either /opt or /usr/local, so people then have the choice. I have
seen that in other packages. As for the RPM, I leave the final proposal to the person
writing the spec file (Paul? Piotr? Konstantin?). We should then commonly agree on the
location based on that proposal. The person supplying the RPM will "officially" become the
RPM maintainer and be responsible for maintaining it.

> installed in /sbin/, /bin/, or /usr/. System administrators can build packages from
> source and install them into the /usr/local/ directory. However, third-party packages
> of add-on software must be installed in /opt/<package>/, where <package> is the name
> that describes a software suite.

Well, midas is kind of in the middle. On one hand it's a third-party package (-> /opt),
but it requires some compilation to allow meaningful work (frontend, analyzer). So maybe
the RPM should go to /opt, and if compiled from the TAR ball it should go to /usr/local?
But that means if someone has to maintain a large basis of midas machines, he/she has to
always search two locations. On the other hand one can alway do a "cd $MIDASSYS" ...

- Stefan
  30   05 Dec 2003 Konstantin Olchanski HOWTO setup MIDAS ROOT tree analysis
> root -l
root> TFile *f = new TFile("run00064.root")
root> TTree *t = f->Get("Trigger")
root> t->StartViewer() // look at the ROOT TTree
root> t->MakeSelector() // generates Trigger.h, Trigger.C

edit run.C, the main program:
{
gROOT->Reset();
TFile f("data/run00064.root");
TTree *t = f.Get("Trigger");

TH1D* adc8 = new TH1D("adc8","ADC8",1500,0,1500-1);
TH1D* tdc2 = new TH1D("tdc2","TDC2",1500,0,1500-1);
TH2D* h12 = new TH2D("h2","ADC8 vs TDC2",100,0,1500,100,0,1500);
TH2D* h12cut = new TH2D("h2cut","ADC8 vs TDC2",50,0,1000-1,50,0,1500);

TSelector *s = TSelector::GetSelector("Trigger.C");
t->Process(s);

adc8->Draw();
tdc2->Draw();
h12->Draw();
h12cut->Draw();
}

edit Trigger.C:

Bool_t Trigger::ProcessCut(Int_t entry)
{
  fChain->GetTree()->GetEntry(entry);
  if (entry%100 == 0) printf("entry %d\r",entry);
  return kTRUE;
}

void Trigger::ProcessFill(Int_t entry)
{
  adc8->Fill(ADCS_ADCS[8]);
  tdc2->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2]);
  h12->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2],ADCS_ADCS[8]);
  if (ADCS_ADCS[8] > 100)
    h12cut->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2],ADCS_ADCS[8]);
}

Run the analysis:

root -l
root> .x run.C

K.O.
  31   20 Jul 2004 Konstantin Olchanski HOWTO setup MIDAS ROOT tree analysis
Updating the instructions to ROOT version 3.10.2. Example is from TRIUMF-KOPIO
tree analysis.

shell> root -l
root> TFile *f = new TFile("run00064.root")
root> Trigger->MakeSelector("TriggerSelector")  // "Trigger" is the tree name
inside the root file. Generates TriggerSelector.h and TriggerSelector.cpp

= edit run.C, the main program:

{
gROOT->Reset();
TSelector *s = TSelector::GetSelector("TriggerSelector.C");

TChain chain("Trigger"); // "Trigger" is the tree name inside the root files
chain.Add("run03016.root"); // can chain multiple files

TH1D* tdc2 = new TH1D("tdc2","TDC2",1500,0,1500-1);

chain.Process(s,"",500); // process 500 events
//chain.Process(s); // or process all events

tdc2->Draw();
}

= edit TriggerSelector.h:

in the TriggerSelector class members, i.e. "UInt_t TDC1_TDC1[47];" edit the
array size to be bigger than the maximum possible bank size

= edit TriggerSelector.C:

Bool_t TriggerSelector::Process(Int_t entry)
{
  fChain->GetTree()->GetEntry(entry);

  if (entry%100 == 0)
    printf("process %d, nTDC %3d, 0x%08x\n",entry,TDC1_nTDC1,TDC1_TDC1[1]);

  tdc2->Fill(TDC1_nTDC1);
  return kTRUE;
}

= Run the analysis:

shell> root -l
root> .x run.C
 
K.O.
  32   05 Dec 2003 Konstantin Olchanski HOWTO setup MIDAS ROOT tree analysis
> root -l
root> TFile *f = new TFile("run00064.root")
root> TTree *t = f->Get("Trigger")
root> t->StartViewer() // look at the ROOT TTree
root> t->MakeSelector() // generates Trigger.h, Trigger.C

edit run.C, the main program:
{
gROOT->Reset();
TFile f("data/run00064.root");
TTree *t = f.Get("Trigger");

TH1D* adc8 = new TH1D("adc8","ADC8",1500,0,1500-1);
TH1D* tdc2 = new TH1D("tdc2","TDC2",1500,0,1500-1);
TH2D* h12 = new TH2D("h2","ADC8 vs TDC2",100,0,1500,100,0,1500);
TH2D* h12cut = new TH2D("h2cut","ADC8 vs TDC2",50,0,1000-1,50,0,1500);

TSelector *s = TSelector::GetSelector("Trigger.C");
t->Process(s);

adc8->Draw();
tdc2->Draw();
h12->Draw();
h12cut->Draw();
}

edit Trigger.C:

Bool_t Trigger::ProcessCut(Int_t entry)
{
  fChain->GetTree()->GetEntry(entry);
  if (entry%100 == 0) printf("entry %d\r",entry);
  return kTRUE;
}

void Trigger::ProcessFill(Int_t entry)
{
  adc8->Fill(ADCS_ADCS[8]);
  tdc2->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2]);
  h12->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2],ADCS_ADCS[8]);
  if (ADCS_ADCS[8] > 100)
    h12cut->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2],ADCS_ADCS[8]);
}

Run the analysis:

root -l
root> .x run.C

K.O.
  33   20 Jul 2004 Konstantin Olchanski HOWTO setup MIDAS ROOT tree analysis
Updating the instructions to ROOT version 3.10.2. Example is from TRIUMF-KOPIO
tree analysis.

shell> root -l
root> TFile *f = new TFile("run00064.root")
root> Trigger->MakeSelector("TriggerSelector")  // "Trigger" is the tree name
inside the root file. Generates TriggerSelector.h and TriggerSelector.cpp

= edit run.C, the main program:

{
gROOT->Reset();
TSelector *s = TSelector::GetSelector("TriggerSelector.C");

TChain chain("Trigger"); // "Trigger" is the tree name inside the root files
chain.Add("run03016.root"); // can chain multiple files

TH1D* tdc2 = new TH1D("tdc2","TDC2",1500,0,1500-1);

chain.Process(s,"",500); // process 500 events
//chain.Process(s); // or process all events

tdc2->Draw();
}

= edit TriggerSelector.h:

in the TriggerSelector class members, i.e. "UInt_t TDC1_TDC1[47];" edit the
array size to be bigger than the maximum possible bank size

= edit TriggerSelector.C:

Bool_t TriggerSelector::Process(Int_t entry)
{
  fChain->GetTree()->GetEntry(entry);

  if (entry%100 == 0)
    printf("process %d, nTDC %3d, 0x%08x\n",entry,TDC1_nTDC1,TDC1_TDC1[1]);

  tdc2->Fill(TDC1_nTDC1);
  return kTRUE;
}

= Run the analysis:

shell> root -l
root> .x run.C
 
K.O.
  34   05 Dec 2003 Konstantin Olchanski HOWTO setup MIDAS ROOT tree analysis
> root -l
root> TFile *f = new TFile("run00064.root")
root> TTree *t = f->Get("Trigger")
root> t->StartViewer() // look at the ROOT TTree
root> t->MakeSelector() // generates Trigger.h, Trigger.C

edit run.C, the main program:
{
gROOT->Reset();
TFile f("data/run00064.root");
TTree *t = f.Get("Trigger");

TH1D* adc8 = new TH1D("adc8","ADC8",1500,0,1500-1);
TH1D* tdc2 = new TH1D("tdc2","TDC2",1500,0,1500-1);
TH2D* h12 = new TH2D("h2","ADC8 vs TDC2",100,0,1500,100,0,1500);
TH2D* h12cut = new TH2D("h2cut","ADC8 vs TDC2",50,0,1000-1,50,0,1500);

TSelector *s = TSelector::GetSelector("Trigger.C");
t->Process(s);

adc8->Draw();
tdc2->Draw();
h12->Draw();
h12cut->Draw();
}

edit Trigger.C:

Bool_t Trigger::ProcessCut(Int_t entry)
{
  fChain->GetTree()->GetEntry(entry);
  if (entry%100 == 0) printf("entry %d\r",entry);
  return kTRUE;
}

void Trigger::ProcessFill(Int_t entry)
{
  adc8->Fill(ADCS_ADCS[8]);
  tdc2->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2]);
  h12->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2],ADCS_ADCS[8]);
  if (ADCS_ADCS[8] > 100)
    h12cut->Fill(TDCS_TDCS[2],ADCS_ADCS[8]);
}

Run the analysis:

root -l
root> .x run.C

K.O.
  35   20 Jul 2004 Konstantin Olchanski HOWTO setup MIDAS ROOT tree analysis
Updating the instructions to ROOT version 3.10.2. Example is from TRIUMF-KOPIO
tree analysis.

shell> root -l
root> TFile *f = new TFile("run00064.root")
root> Trigger->MakeSelector("TriggerSelector")  // "Trigger" is the tree name
inside the root file. Generates TriggerSelector.h and TriggerSelector.cpp

= edit run.C, the main program:

{
gROOT->Reset();
TSelector *s = TSelector::GetSelector("TriggerSelector.C");

TChain chain("Trigger"); // "Trigger" is the tree name inside the root files
chain.Add("run03016.root"); // can chain multiple files

TH1D* tdc2 = new TH1D("tdc2","TDC2",1500,0,1500-1);

chain.Process(s,"",500); // process 500 events
//chain.Process(s); // or process all events

tdc2->Draw();
}

= edit TriggerSelector.h:

in the TriggerSelector class members, i.e. "UInt_t TDC1_TDC1[47];" edit the
array size to be bigger than the maximum possible bank size

= edit TriggerSelector.C:

Bool_t TriggerSelector::Process(Int_t entry)
{
  fChain->GetTree()->GetEntry(entry);

  if (entry%100 == 0)
    printf("process %d, nTDC %3d, 0x%08x\n",entry,TDC1_nTDC1,TDC1_TDC1[1]);

  tdc2->Fill(TDC1_nTDC1);
  return kTRUE;
}

= Run the analysis:

shell> root -l
root> .x run.C
 
K.O.
  36   15 Dec 2003 Pierre-André Amaudruz ROOT GUI at Triumf
The current Triumf DAQ standard (Midas) since the second quarter of this
year (2003) has the capability to deal with ROOT histograms. The internal
midas logger can save data files in ROOT format and the analyzer can book
and fill ROOT histograms. These features triggered a new project started
during summer 2003 for building a Triumf GUI ROOT/Midas display utility.

The initial requirements for this utility are:
1) Solely based on ROOT (VirtualX, no Qt)
2) Similar overall functionality than PAW.
   - Open concurrent ROOT files.
   - Open connection to a single Midas Online experiment (requires analyzer
                                                          as server)
   - Optional Auto-update in ONLINE mode.
   - Zoning, Zooming option display.
   - Simple Historgram gaphic manipulation. (based on current ROOT
                                             implementation)
   - Tree manipulation ( use of TBrowser())
   - Simple user script invocation.
   - Optional experiment specific customization.
3) Session configuration save/restore option.

An initial version has been developed and currently is under evaluation.
Improvement and further development will based on the local experimenters
responses. 

This utility will be available for external use around the second quarter of
the 2004 at the latest.

.
  37   02 Jul 2003 Pierre-André Amaudruz Midas/ROOT Analyser situation
The current and future situation of the Midas analyzer is summarized in the
attachment below.

Box explanation:
================
Front end:
---------
Midas code for accessing/gathering the hardware information into the Midas
format.

Midas SHM:
---------
Midas back end shared memory where the front end data are sent to.

mlogger:
-------
Data logger collecting the midas events and storing them on a physical
logging device (Disk, Tape)

Midas Analyzer:
--------------
Midas client for event-by-event analysis. Incoming data can be either online
or offline.

mserver:
-------
Subprocess interfacing external (remote) midas client to the centralized
data collection and database system.

PAW:
---
Standalone physics data analyzer (CERN).

ROOT:
----
Standalone Physics data analyser (CERN).


This diagram represents the data path from the Frontend to the analyzer in
online and offline mode. Each data path is annoted with a circled number
discussed below. In all cases, the data will flow from the front end
application to the midas back end data buffers which reside in a specific
share memory for a given experiment.

Path:
(1): From the shared memory, the midas analyzer can request events directly
and process them for output to divers destination.

(2): The data logger is a specific application which stores all the data to
 a storage media such as a disk or tape. This path is specific to the
creation of file.mid file format. The actual storage file in this .mid
format can be readout later on by the midas analyzer.

(3): The Midas analyzer has been developed originally for interfacing to the
PAW analyzer which uses its own shared memory segment for online display.
The analyzer can also save the data into a specific data format consistent
with PAW (HBOOK and Ntuples, extension .rz).

(4): Presently the data logger support a creation of the ROOT file format.
This file contains in the form of a Tree the midas event-by-event data. This
file is fully compatible with ROOT and therefore can be read out by the
standard ROOT application.

(5): Equivalent to the data logger, the analyzer receiving from the data
buffer or reading from a .mid file data can apply an event-by-event analysis
and on request produce a compliant ROOT file for further analysis. This
.root file can be composed of Trees as well as histograms.

(6): The possibility of ONLINE ROOT analysis has been implemented in a first
stage through the TMapFile (ROOT shared memory). While this configuration is
still in use an experiment, the intention is to deprecate it and replace it
with the data path (7).

(7): This path uses the network socket channel to transfer data out of the
analyzer to the ROOT environment. The current analyzer has a limited support
for ROOT analysis by only publishing on request the Midas analysis built in
histograms. No mean is yet implemented for Tree passing mechanism.

(8): The pass has not been yet investigated, but ROOT does provide
accessibility to external function calls which makes this option possible.
The ROOT framework will then perform dedicated event call to the main midas
data buffer using the standard midas communication scheme. The data format
translation from Midas banks to ROOT format will have to be taken care at
the user level in the ROOT environment.


Discussion:
==========
Presently the Socket communication between Midas and ROOT (7) is under
revision by Stefan Ritt and René Brun. This revision will simplify the
remote access of an object such as an histogram. For the Tree itself, the
requirement would be to implement a "ring buffer" mechanism for remote tree
request. This is currently under discussion.

The path (8) has been suggested by Triumf to address small experiment setup
where only a single analyzer is required. This path minimize the DAQ
requirements by moving all the data analysis handling to the user.
The same ROOT analysis code would be applicable to a ONLINE as well as
OFFLINE analysis.

Cons:
- Necessity of publishing raw data through the network for every instance of
the remote analyzer.
- Result sharing of the analysis cannot be done yet in real time.

Pros:
- No need of extra task for data translation (midas/root).
- Unique data unpacking code part of the user code.
- Less CPU requirement.

Other issues:
============
- The current necessity of the Midas shared memory for the midas analyzer to
run is a concern in particular for offline analysis where a priori no midas
is available. 

- The handling of the run/analyzer parameters. Possible parameter extraction
from file.odb.
Attachment 1: midas-root.jpg
midas-root.jpg
  38   21 Sep 2004 Konstantin Olchanski ODB-EPICS gateway
At TRIUMF, we use several different versions of code to interface MIDAS and
EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics). Now that we more or less understand
our needs, I propose this design for a simplified "EPICS" MIDAS frontend. I
would like to keep this new front end in the MIDAS CVS repository, possibly
replacing the existing EPICS frontend in examples/epics.

The basic idea is to provide an ODB-driven bi-directional gateway between
EPICS and ODB with this functionality: periodically read EPICS data and save
it in ODB, optionally generate MIDAS events with EPICS data; for writing
data to EPICS, use hotlinks- if the user changes "write" variables in ODB,
the changes are sent to EPICS.

1) ODB structure
   /equipment/epicsgw/
     common/...
     statistics/...
     variables/
       epics[...] <--- EPICS->ODB data (double[])
       write[...] <--- ODB->EPICS data (double[])
     settings/
       num epics  <--- number of epics variables (int)
       num write  <--- number of write variables (int)
       names epics <--- human-readable names for EPICS variables (string[])
       names write <--- human-readable names for EPICS variables (string[])
       chans epics <--- EPICS channels for epics-read data (string[])
       chans write <--- EPICS channels for epics-write data (string[])
       period      <--- EPICS read period in milliseconds (int[])
       enable epics <-- enable (y/n) epics-read (bool[])
       enable write <-- enable (y/n) epics-write (bool[])
       enable events <- enable event generation (bool)

2) EPICS to ODB data path: periodically read each enabled "epics" variable
and write the data values to ODB. Other front ends can hotlink the "epics"
variables to receive updated epics data.

3) ODB to EPICS data path: monitor the hotlink to ".../variables/write". If
data changes, send the changes to EPICS. At startup, write all "write"
variables to EPICS.

4) event generation: TBD.

5) error handling: TBD.

K.O.
  39   21 Sep 2004 Stefan Ritt ODB-EPICS gateway
The easiest way to achieve this is to write a new class driver, probably derived
from the multi.c class driver. One has just to rename all "output" with "write"
(or better "ODB2EPICS") and all "input" with "EPICS2ODB". The multi class driver
handles already a factor/offset for each channel (which could be 1/0 of course),
a threshold to update the ODB/EPICS only when a value changes significantly, to
retrieve labes from the bus driver (EPICS labes -> ODB settings), automatic
event generation and error handling. So it would be a good starting point.

What one gets from the class driver in the ODB is:

  /equipment/<name>/
     variables/
        Input[]     <--- read from the bus driver (float)
        Output[]    <--- witten to the bus driver (float)
     settings/
        Names Input[]        <--- human readable names
        Names Output[]       <--- human readable names
        Update Threshold[]
        Input Offset[]
        Input Factor[]
        Output Offset[]
        Output Factor[]
        Devices/
           Input/
              DD/   <--- parameters for Device Driver
                 ... Epics addresses, flags etc.
              BD/   <--- parameters for Bus Driver
           Output/
        
So if one uses the standard mfe.c code together with the multi.c class driver
and epics_ca.c device driver all what is left is the following:

- replace cd_gen.c by multi.c in the examples/epics directory
- break down the already existing flags into enable epics/write/events
- maybe add th EPICS read period

The last two things should be done in the epics_ca.c device driver, so one can
use the multi.c class driver without any change. Event generation and error
handling then comes for free.
  40   31 Aug 2004 Konstantin Olchanski midas odb locking
One of our experiments is suffering from periodic ODB corruption and I
suspected that there might be a problem with ODB locking. In the last few
days, I finally had time to read the ODB locking code, to write a little
test program and to play with ODB. This is what I found:

1) ODB locking appears to be sound, my test program failed to find any
locking flaws, except for a big problem, described below. Please read on.

2) ODB locking is "unfair". A program "while (1) { lock(); do_stuff();
unlock(); /* no sleep here */ }" would lock out other users of ODB
(including odbedit) for seconds and minutes at a time. I see this as a flaw
in the semop() implementation in the Linux kernel and I cannot think of an
easy way to fix it in our code. (I tested only on RHL9 2.4.20-31.9smp on a
dual CPU machine. 2.6 kernels may work better).

3) presently, we use an infinite timeout waiting for the ODB lock. I suggest
we set the timeout to, say, 5 minutes, to protect against dead (or live)
locks that we saw a few times here at TRIUMF- every ODB client would hang
without any error messages or explanations forever waiting for the ODB lock
that is held by some rogue ODB client stuck in an infinite loop in corrupted
ODB.

4) while reading the locking code in db_{lock,unlock}_database(), I thought
that there is a race condition against the "lock_cnt" variable, until I
realized that this variable is local and there is no race condition. I would
like to comment this in the code?

5) I found a failure mode where db_close_database() erroneously deletes the
lock semaphore. Once the semaphore is deleted, ODB locking silently fails
(in db_lock_database() we do not check for success status of
mutex_wait_for()) and remaining ODB clients operate without locking protection.

This failure happens after ODB undercounts active clients after losing track
of clients removed by "idle timeouts" (and by other checks?). At some point,
db_close_database() decides that there are no more clients left, attempts to
delete the shared memory (this fails because there are still active clients
attached) and deletes the lock semaphore. Afterwards, the remaining "lost"
active clients operate without lock protection. This would tend to happen
while shutting down all clients, a time when they all rush-in to delete
themselves from "/system/clients", unsuring ODB corruption.

A quick solution I just coded would not work for mmap()-based shared memory
(I destroy the lock semaphore after the ODB shared memory is destroyed) as
this relies on "shm_nattch" counting feature of System-V shared memories,
absent in the mmap() based shared memories. Since the Windows implementation
uses mmap(), my "solution" is an obvious no-go. Alternatives would be to add
a second semaphore, just for counting active ODB clients (kluncky); or never
delete the semaphore in the first place (dirty, and how does one clear it if
it gets stuck in the locked state?).

For now, I would like to add a check to ss_mutex_waitfor() call in
db_lock_database() and crash if we can't get the mutex. Returning an error
code would be cleaner, but would not work because nobody checks the return
status of db_lock_database(). If can't get the mutex for (say) 5 minutes, I
think we should crash, too- something is very wrong and it is pointless to
continue waiting.

K.O.
ELOG V3.1.4-2e1708b5